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ASP.NET Web API - Screencast series Part 4: Paging and Querying

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We're continuing a six part series on ASP.NET Web API that accompanies the getting started screencast series. This is an introductory screencast series that walks through from File / New Project to some more advanced scenarios like Custom Validation and Authorization. The screencast videos are all short (3-5 minutes) and the sample code for the series is both available for download and browsable online. I did the screencasts, but the samples were written by the ASP.NET Web API team. In Part 1 we looked at what ASP.NET Web API is, why you'd care, did
the File / New Project thing, and did some basic HTTP testing using browser F12 developer tools. In Part 2 we started to build up a sample that returns data from a repository in JSON format via GET methods. In Part 3, we modified data on the server using DELETE and POST methods. In Part 4, we'll extend on our simple querying methods form Part 2, adding in support for paging and querying. This part shows two approaches to querying data (paging really just being...(Read whole news on source site)

ASP.NET Web API - Screencast series Part 3: Delete and Update

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We're continuing a six part series on ASP.NET Web API that accompanies the getting started screencast series. This is an introductory screencast series that walks through from File / New Project to some more advanced scenarios like Custom Validation and Authorization. The screencast videos are all short (3-5 minutes) and the sample code for the series is both available for download and browsable online. I did the screencasts, but the samples were written by the ASP.NET Web API team. In Part 1 we looked at what ASP.NET Web API is, why you'd care, did
the File / New Project thing, and did some basic HTTP testing using browser F12 developer tools. In Part 2 we started to build up a sample that returns data from a repository in JSON format via GET methods. In Part 3, we'll start to modify data on the server using DELETE and POST methods. So far we've been looking at GET requests, and the difference between standard browsing in a web browser and navigating an HTTP API isn't quite as clear. Delete is where the difference...(Read whole news on source site)

Daily WP7 Development News 16 March 2012

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How to Overwrite WP7 Style Theme

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source: underbridgecity.net I was working on a Windows Phone 7 application and the client wanted to always have the light theme and have a special accent color depending on settings inside the app. They wanted to do this for branding reasons so I had to find a way to always have this app look like it was in the light theme and override the accent color to the colors they wanted. I will now go over how I did that. You can use this to always have the light theme for the app like the native
mail app, or even create your own custom theme. ...Read more ...(Read whole news on source site)

Diagnosing weird problems - a Stack Overflow case study

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Earlier, I came across this Stack Overflow question. I solved it, tweeted it, but then thought it would serve as a useful case study into the mental processes I go through when trying to solve a problem - whether that's on Stack Overflow, at work, or at home. It's definitely worth reading the original question, but the executive summary is: When I compute the checksum/hash of c:\Windows\System32\Calc.exe using various tools and algorithms, those tools all give the same answer for each algorithm. When I try doing the same thing in Java, I get different
results. What's going on? Now to start with, I'd like to shower a bit of praise on the author: The post came with a short but utterly complete program to demonstrate the problem The comments in the program showed the expected values and the actual values The code was mostly pretty clean (clean enough for an SO post anyway) In short, it had pretty much everything I ask for in a question. Yay! Additionally, the result seemed to be strange. The chances...(Read whole news on source site)

ASP.NET Web API - Screencast series Part 2: Getting Data

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We're continuing a six part series on ASP.NET Web API that accompanies the getting started screencast series. This is an introductory screencast series that walks through from File / New Project to some more advanced scenarios like Custom Validation and Authorization. The screencast videos are all short (3-5 minutes) and the sample code for the series is both available for download and browsable online. I did the screencasts, but the samples were written by the ASP.NET Web API team. In Part 1 we looked at what ASP.NET Web API is, why you'd care, did
the File / New Project thing, and did some basic HTTP testing using browser F12 developer tools. This second screencast starts to build out the Comments example - a JSON API that's accessed via jQuery. This sample uses a simple in-memory repository. At this early stage, the GET /api/values/ just returns an IEnumerable. In part 4 we'll add on paging and filtering, and it gets more interesting.   The get by id (e.g. GET /api/values/5) case is a little more interesting. The method just returns a Comment...(Read whole news on source site)

ASP.NET Web API - Screencast series with downloadable sample code - Part 1

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There's a lot of great ASP.NET Web API content on the ASP.NET website at http://asp.net/web-api. I mentioned my screencast series in original announcement post, but we've since added the sample code so I thought it was worth pointing the series out specifically. This is an introductory screencast series that walks through from File / New Project to some more advanced scenarios like Custom Validation and Authorization. The screencast videos are all short (3-5 minutes) and the sample code for the series is both available for download and browsable online. I did the screencasts,
but the samples were written by the ASP.NET Web API team. So - let's watch them together! Grab some popcorn and pay attention, because these are short. After each video, I'll talk about what I thought was important. I'm embedding the videos using HTML5 (MP4) with Silverlight fallback, but if something goes wrong or your browser / device / whatever doesn't support them, I'll include the link to where the videos are more professionally hosted on the ASP.NET site. Note also if you're following along with the samples that, since Part 1 just looks at the File /...(Read whole news on source site)

PostSharp 2.1 in Continuous Deployment

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With all the good reasons mentioned by Ayende, we decided to officially switch PostSharp 2.1 to a continuous deployment process. We are abandoning the distinction between “milestone releases” and “hotfixes”. Since today, you will know always download the latest revision from the principal download page, as well as on NuGet. Ayende’s article came at a time when we were frustrated with our release cycle. Although we released dozens of hotfixes, the front-page download was still the initial 2.1 RTM release because we constantly deferred the SP1. Clearly, the majority of people were not downloading the best-quality release,
and were therefore hitting bugs that have already been solved for a long time. Not the best user experience! Technically, the difference is quite small. PostSharp’s build and test processes have always been automated. It takes about 50 minutes to build and test all components. Uploading to our download manager is very easy too – copy the build output to a network share and execute a script that synchronizes with Amazon S3. Therefore, the time-to-market of a bug fix has always been very short – a couple of hours, typically. The fact that deployment is now integrated with the...(Read whole news on source site)

GiveCamp

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What’s A GiveCamp? 
I spent the weekend of 21st-23rd October last year working for charity at GiveCamp. What’s a GiveCamp? Givecamp is an event where technology experts give their time over a weekend to build projects for charities. It’s funded by corporate sponsorship, which means it’s free to attend for both the charities and the volunteers. The concept originates from Microsoft in Texas in 2007 – since then over $1m worth of time and consultancy has been donated. In 2011, GiveCamp UK was the first GiveCamp to be held outside the USA. I got involved through knowing the organisers;
many of my friends from the UK Microsoft programming community were also there. 


How Does It Work? 
We assembled at UCL’s Bloomsbury Campus on the afternoon of 21st October, where there was a chance for a cup of coffee and a gossip with people while we waited to find out where we needed to be. At about 5pm we all trooped into a lecture theatre, where representatives from a set of charities each delivered a short pitch about their charity, and more importantly, the project they wanted people to tackle over the weekend. In the main room, there...(Read whole news on source site)

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