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One Year At GitHub

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As of today, I’ve been a GitHub employee for one year and I gotta tell you… Please forgive me a brief moment to gush, but I really love this company. I  work with a lot of great people. Crazy people for sure, but great. I love them all. Just look at these crazy folks! I once told a friend that I’ve long had the idea to start a company that would be my ideal work environment. GitHub is better than that company. What Makes it Special? One of my
co-workers Rob Sanheim recently reached his seven month anniversary at GitHub and wrote a succinct post that answers this question. And I’m glad for that as it saves me from the trouble of writing a longer more rambling unfocused version of his post. Rob breaks it down to five key points: Great people above all else Positive Peer Pressure GitHub Hiring Culture of Shipping Optimize for Happiness Then again, if I didn’t...(Read whole news on source site)

Google and Bing Map APIs Compared

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At one of the local golf courses I frequent, there is an open grass field next to the course. It is about eight acres in size and mowed regularly. It is permissible to hit golf balls there—you bring and shag our own balls. My golf colleagues and I spend hours there practicing, chatting and in general just wasting time. One of the guys brings Ginger, the amazing, incredible, wonder dog. Ginger is a Hungarian Vizlas (or Hungarian pointer). She chases squirrels, begs for snacks and supervises us closely to make sure we don't misbehave.    
Anyway, I decided
to make a dedicated web page to measure distances on the field in yards using online mapping services. I started with Google maps and then did the same application with Bing maps. It is a good way to become familiar with the APIs. Here are images of the final two maps: Google:  Bing:   To start with online mapping services, you need to visit the respective websites and get a developers key. I pared the code down to the minimum to make it easier to compare the APIs. Google maps required this CSS (or it wouldn't work):

Microsoft Changes Developer Account Registration Requirements

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Over the last couple of weeks I have noticed that Microsoft seems to have changed the requirements for Corporate accounts.  These requirements were not in effect when I originally setup the account for the company that I work for.  We also recently had our corporate account canceled without explanation and are in the process of working to get it reinstated.  This all seems to revolve around rules to increase confidence that in the producers of content.  They are now having Symantec validate a company based on legal documents. In the past there have been problems with getting credit cards
accepted.  We have had to setup new Live IDs to satisfy whatever glitch the system had or unexplainable requirement.  I am hoping that in the time that has elapsed these problems have been resolved. In truth I can’t say that these new requirements weren’t always in place, but it is getting frustrating to help clients setup accounts.  I am encourage that they have taken steps to safeguard the consumer from Joe-fly-by-night, but they also need to make sure that the process doesn’t become so complex that it drives away companies from participating in the store.  We will have to...(Read whole news on source site)

Silverlight is “dead”

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The Silverlight.net web site is apparently now gone, merged into the broader msdn.com ecosystem (where it belonged in the first place imo): http://www.zdnet.com/microsoft-pulls-the-plug-on-its-silverlight-net-site-7000008494/ As we’ve known now for a long time, Silverlight is “dead”. It is in support mode and will be for a decade. Just like Windows Forms has been since 2005, and WPF is now as well (do you really think Microsoft is going to divert money from WinRT to do anything with WPF at this point??? If so I’ve got this beachfront property for sale…). As an aside, ASP.NET Web Forms also “died” in 2005, but recently got a major infusion of money
in .NET 4.5 – showing that even a “dead” technology can receive a big cash investment sometimes – though it still isn’t clear that this will be enough to breath any new life into Web Forms for most organizations. I suspect it is more likely that this recent investment will just allow organizations with massive Web Forms sites to keep them limping along for another 5-10 years. If a technology is defined as “dead” when its vendor stops enhancing it and starts maintaining it while they put most of their money into the future, then I must say that I’ve spent pretty much my entire ~25...(Read whole news on source site)

Configuring IIS methods for ASP.NET Web API on Windows Azure Websites and elsewhere

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That’s a pretty long title, I agree. When working on my implementation of RFC2324, also known as the HyperText Coffee Pot Control Protocol, I’ve been struggling with something that you will struggle with as well in your ASP.NET Web API’s: supporting additional HTTP methods like HEAD, PATCH or PROPFIND. ASP.NET Web API has no issue with those, but when hosting them on IIS you’ll find yourself in Yellow-screen-of-death heaven. The reason why IIS blocks these methods (or fails to route them to ASP.NET) is because it may happen that your IIS installation has some configuration leftovers from another API:
WebDAV. WebDAV allows you to work with a virtual filesystem (and others) using a HTTP API. IIS of course supports this (because flagship product “SharePoint” uses it, probably) and gets in the way of your API. Bottom line of the story: if you need those methods or want to provide your own HTTP methods, here’s the bit of configuration to add to your Web.config file:

Daily Windows Phone Development News 7 Dec 2012

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by WindowsPhoneGeek Daily Windows Phone Development News 7 Dec 2012: Top Story: Sketch Pad App Full Source Code offered via the WPGeek Component Marketplace The winner of a Nokia Premium Development Membership for 6 Dec Announced Digitimes Research: 52.5 million Windows Phones to be sold in 2013 Sketch Pad App Full Source Code offered via the WPGeek Component Marketplace Windows Phone 8 Jump Start Training available online
href="http://windowsphonegeek.com/news/the-secrets-of-the-windows-phone-8-keyboard" target="_blank">The secrets of the Windows Phone 8 keyboard For 25 days, every day we will giveaway a Nokia Premium Developer Program Membership Giveaway! Subscribe to our News feed or follow us on Twitter @winphonegeek . (We list the latest Windows Phone development activities....(Read whole news on source site)

Daily Windows 8 Development News 7 Dec 2012

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8 Apps: ASP.NET Web API You can also subscribe to our Windows 8 Dev News feed or follow us on Twitter @winphonegeek . (We list the latest Windows Phone 7 development activities.)...(Read whole news on source site)

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