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The subtleties of developer commitment

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In a recent post, I concluded that I have a strong tendency towards tactical architecture. From that perspective, I try to avoid big-design-upfront. I have a built-in allergy for rebuilding stuff that is already out there. I would never consider building my own message bus or event sourcing framework for instance. I also react pretty strongly when people are suggesting things like that and believe that this is a common source for project failures. I know that I myself can be way too optimistic about any development work I'm starting, regardless of my pessimistic eye for roadblocks and risks.
So if an experienced developer claims some big design thing is going to be pretty easy or obvious, they'll have a very hard time convincing me. But there are two other factors to include in such a tradeoff. First of all, I do know that occasionally some level of strategic architecture is needed. You can't just build a large scale distributed system without doing at least a decent amount of upfront design. But even then I'd like to keep an eye on the reversibility of such a design decision. In other words, if we can postpone a design...(Read whole news on source site)

Getting Signal/R clients to work on Windows 10 UWP apps

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Very recently Windows 10 IoT Core became available – just one of the very exiting technologies Microsoft are are cranking out like crazy now. This will enable even the humblest of devices to run Universal Windows Platform apps  Especially in the IoT space technologies like Signal/R are key – to enable devices to quickly exchange and distribute data. Unfortunately, if you add the Microsoft.AspNet.SignalR.Client NuGet package to an UWP and try to connect to a hub, using this code:var hubConnection = new HubConnection("http://www.microsoft.com"); await hubConnection.Start(); You will run into this error: An exception of type 'System.IO.FileNotFoundException' occurred in Microsoft.AspNet.SignalR.Client.dll
but was not handled in user code Additional information: Could not load file or assembly 'System.Net, Version=2.0.5.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=7cec85d7bea7798e, Retargetable=Yes' or one of its dependencies. The system cannot find the file specified. And I was not the first one, as can be seen on the Github issues page and this Stackoverflow page.This has nothing to do with Silverlight 5, as is suggested in the comments. Apparently there is some NuGet target mismatch. I don’t quite understand the finer points, but I have found a workaround. I cloned the SignalR repository from Github. When that was done, I...(Read whole news on source site)

10 Reasons Why ASP.NET is Not Worth Choosing For

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Originally posted on: http://geekswithblogs.net/dotNETvinz/archive/2015/06/01/10-reasons-why-asp.net-is-not-worth-choosing-for.aspxI’m sure you’ve heard a lot of great things about ASP.NET before. If there are many reasons why you must choose ASP.NET, here are the 10 reasons to convince you to drop your plans on choosing ASP.NET. It’s not worth it. 1. Provides 3 Development Platforms that bores you Web Forms, MVC and Web Pages are used by millions of developers around the world. 2. There’s nothing modern about ASP.NET 3. It has limited developer audience 4. And so with
the supported databases 5. Its not exciting 6. You can build ASP.NET apps using “unfamiliar” development environment and editor 7. It’s just a web technology that enables you to RUN and DEPLOY apps anywhere 8. With not so many online community supports · ASP.NET on CodePlex – This CodePlex project gives you access to the code for prior releases that the Microsoft ASP.NET team worked on. · ASP.NET Official Website – The one stop site for learning ASP.NET ...(Read whole news on source site)

Joined the 100K Recognition Points Club in the ASP.NET Forums Hall of Fame

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Originally posted on: http://geekswithblogs.net/dotNETvinz/archive/2015/05/16/joined-the-100k-recognition-points-club-in-the-asp.net-forums.aspx I can't believed I will reach this boundary. Despite all the busy stuff that's going on in my life and at work, I still manage to contribute to the ASP.NET community and helped thousands of people resolving issues and guiding them to the right path of ASP.NET world. I am really honored to achieved this milestone and it feels great. If time permits, I hope I could be able to do the same at other various forums that I have participated such as C# Corner, CodeASP, ASPSnippets and Xamarin community forums.
Thanks for dropping by. See you at the forums
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...(Read whole news on source site)

I am speaking at TechDays 2015

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Happy to announce that I am speaking at Techdays 2015 Netherlands on automating the Azure infrastructure. Here are the details of my session
Managing your Azure infrastructure with Chef and DSC
Date and time: 29-May-2015, 15:15 - 16:15
Venue: North America

I'll be showing how to leverage the capabilities of Chef and DSC to automate windows Azure infrastructure. DSC is a way to automate infrastructure management using a configuration driven approach where the desired state of the machine/ machines can be configured and ensure that the machines adhere to it all the times. Chef provides a cross-platform ecosystem of tools and
patterns for taking DSC from feature to full solution. The combination of Chef and DSC make a powerful companion for managing your Azure infrastructure. In this session, we'll see how the combination enables you to work effectively with your cloud infrastructure. Can’t wait to see you all there!
...(Read whole news on source site)

Managing your Azure infrastructure as code - part 4 (Chef and DSC)

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Chef and DSC
DSC is a new management platform in Windows PowerShell that enables deploying and managing configuration data for software services and managing the environment in which these services run.
DSC provides a set of Windows PowerShell language extensions, new Windows PowerShell cmdlets, and resources that you can use to declaratively specify how you want your software environment to be configured. It also provides a means to maintain and manage existing configurations.
With the release of Chef Client 11.16.0 PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) support was introduced into Chef Client for Windows. With this feature DSC resources can be executed from Chef.
Both DSC and chef are similar in the way that both are idempotent, take similar approaches to the concept of resources, describe the configuration of a system, and then take the steps required to do that configuration. The most important difference between Chef and DSC is that Chef uses Ruby and DSC is exposed as configuration data from within Windows PowerShell. The dsc_resource resource allows any DSC resource to be used in a Chef recipe, as well as any custom resources that have been added to your Windows PowerShell environment.
The syntax for using the dsc_resource resource in a recipe...(Read whole news on source site)

Managing your Azure infrastructure as code - part 3 [Chef cookbooks]

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Cookbooks
In Chef cookbooks serve as the fundamental unit of configuration and policy distribution. Chef uses cookbooks to perform work and make sure things are as they should be on the node. Cookbooks are the way Chef users package, distribute, and share configuration details. A cookbook usually configures only one service. For e.g. the general structure of a cookbook contains of the elements as given below (attributes, definition, files, recipes etc.)

The important concepts for a cookbook are attributes and recipes. Attributes are defined in the cookbook that can be used to override the default settings on a node.
When a cookbook is loaded during a chef-client run, these attributes are compared to the attributes that are already present on the node. Attributes that are defined in attribute files are first loaded according to cookbook order. For each cookbook, attributes in the default.rb file are loaded first, and then additional attribute files (if present) are loaded in lexical sort order. When the cookbook attributes take precedence over the default attributes, the chef-client will apply those new settings and values during the chef-client run on the node. Recipes are Ruby files in which you use Chef's Domain Specific Language (DSL)...(Read whole news on source site)

Visual Studio Online Update – May 15th

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This week we are deploying our sprint 82 work for VS Online.  This is a very BIG deployment – lot’s of stuff.  You can read the release notes. First and foremost Build.VNext is here!  It is now in Public Preview and everyone can try it.  We also now have a hosted build pool so you don’t have to install a local build agent on Windows if you don’t want to.  If you want to build on Linux or the MacOS, you will still need to setup up local agent for now. Since I offered a early peek
at Build.VNext on my blog a month or so ago, I’ve been inundated with people requesting to have their account enabled.  It’s been really great to see how much interest there has been.  Now everyone has it and you don’t need to ask for it any longer. I’ve also gotten a ton of questions about enabling something akin to gated checkin and checkin policies for Git.  This deployment introduces Branch policies that enable this.  We have not yet exposed an extensibility mechanism but plan to in the future.  For now we have a build policy that’s akin to gated...(Read whole news on source site)

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