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Orlando Code Camp 2015 #OrlandoCC

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We are just over 3 weeks away from our 10th annual Orlando Code Camp!  I always look forward to this awesome event put together by the Orlando .NET User Group. This is already proving to be our biggest Code Camp ever, with 78 speakers and over 90 sessions, I’m confident that we’ll have more than […]

taskeng.exe command prompt - get out of my face

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  So I was minding my own business working, and suddenly, a command prompt popped up, blocking my work for a few seconds and then disappeared.  Very annoying.  Because now I'm distracted.  I need to hunt this thing down.   Figure: It can look like this.   A quick Bing search reveals that this is actually frequently reported, but most people have the wrong idea to go about fixing this.  They think "oh this is a virus, because I don't know what it was", so I'm going to run anti-virus and
just blast away everything.   Here's what you should do.   Task Engine is Windows' Schedule Tasks.  It is running something.  That something can be a virus, but most likely, something you have installed. So run Task Scheduler Expand the "Task Status" area - this shows you tasks that has run in the selected time period.  You will see there are hundreds of tasks that has ran and will be running. Change the time period filter to the smallest setting "Last hour" Now...(Read whole news on source site)

Cordova and Visual Studio CODE Magazine Article

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Nice – looks like my Cordova with Visual Studio article went live to day in CODE Magazine as the cover article: I’ve been doing quite a bit of hybrid Cordova development in the last few months with a couple of customer projects as well as a couple of pet projects. I’ve been really impressed with the tooling that Visual Studio provides for building and testing Cordova apps, especially for iOS devices. This article reflects my experiences specifically with a focus on the iOS development and debugging cycle. I created a small sample app that is outlined briefly described
in the article and provided on GitHub for you to play with: The app is a small AngularJS application that runs with local data. I’ve used this app for a number of different samples including MVC, SPA, Web API and vNext examples, so if you’ve followed some of my other articles you probably find this sample familiar. For Cordova, this sample was modified a bit to be more mobile friendly and adapt better for different mobile device formats. Anyway, go check out the article – I think it’s a good (and long) one. Resources Taming Mobile Apps...(Read whole news on source site)

Hallway Conversations: How to Succeed in Agile

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A couple of weeks ago, I sat down to talk Agile with Phil Japikse, Stephen Bohlen, and Lee Brandt and their podcast called Hallway Conversations. We spent an hour getting down to basics with Agile.  We talked about how companies are getting into Agile practices, measuring progress, tools, doing things “right”, and much more. It […]

ASP.NET 5 - A Deep Dive into the ASP.NET 5 Runtime

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ASP.NET 5 - A Deep Dive into the ASP.NET 5 Runtime



Web.config and System.Configuration-style app.config files aren’t
supported in ASP.NET 5. Instead, ASP.NET 5 comes with a new, simplified
Configuration API (Microsoft.Framework.ConfigurationModel, at bit.ly/1yxC7gA)
for working with configuration data. The new Configuration API lets you
retrieve and manipulate configuration data from a variety of sources.
Default configuration providers are included for JSON, XML, INI,
command-line parameters and environment variables. 



Walking the dependencies in project.json and building up the closure of
dependencies the app will use.
The dependency-­walking logic is
described in more detail at bit.ly/1y5lZEm.



how you can use the KRE Version Manager (KVM) tool to list the installed
KREs on your machine, install new ones and select the KRE you want to
use. You can find instructions for how to install the KVM for your OS at
bit.ly/1y5mqyi.



“Introducing the ASP.NET 5 Preview” article from the special Dec. 15, 2014, Issue of MSDN Magazine (bit.ly/1K4PY4U)....(Read whole news on source site)

PowerShell : A deep dive into remoting - part 2

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To get PowerShell remoting working, you need to have the WinRM service up and running and configure it for remoting. WinRm is Microsoft’s implementation of the industry standard WS-Management Protocol which is a DMTF open standard defining a SOAP-based protocol for the management of servers, devices, applications and various Web services. WinRM uses SOAP over HTTP and HTTPS, and thus is considered a firewall-friendly protocol. It was designed to provide interoperability and consistency for enterprise networks that have a variety of operating systems, to locate and exchange management information. WinRM is not exclusive to PowerShell, but when received a
traffic that is tagged for PowerShell it can take care of accepting and passing the details to PowerShell.
WinRM is the “server” component of remote management application and WinRS (Windows Remote Shell) is the “client” for WinRM, which runs on the remote computer attempting to remotely manage the WinRM server. It’s important that the computer that needs to be remotly accessed and the computer that has to access the remote computers must have WinRM installed and enabled on them for WinRS to work and retrieve information from the remote system

To setup the computer for remote access, you need...(Read whole news on source site)

PowerShell: A deep dive into remoting – part 1

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One of the most important aspects of PowerShell is remoting. Introduced in PowerShell v2, remoting is a complex technology with a lot of confusion around it. I’ll try to go deep into the concepts of powershell remoting and technologies and see how it all works together with different protocols and implementations.
Classic cmdlets that have the –ComputerName parameter:

These commands use their own proprietary communications protocols, most often DCOM or RPC, and are generally limited to a single task. With this type of remoting, it is up to the cmdlet author to choose and implement the appropriate technology. You
can find out these commands by using the Get-Command cmdlet and filtering them based on the parameter containing ComputerName as given below.

Get-Command  -CommandType  Cmdlet|? {$_.Parameters.Keys –contains “ComputerName”}

Lets try to see the behavior of couple of these cmdlets for eg. Get-Process and Get-Service. You can invoke both of these cmdlets on a remote computer by using the ComputerName parameter as
Get-Service –ComputerName “COMP1” | select name
Get-Process –ComputerName “COMP1” | select name

PowerShell will try to authenticate to the remote machine using the current user account. If the current user is also added into...(Read whole news on source site)

Create a Build vNext build definition

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I am going to show how to create a Build.vNext build definition on VSO. Microsoft recently announced the creation of a brand new build system for TFS and VSO at the Connect event last year. This new build system will eventually replace the current one and be much more modular and friendly. Happily I am in the early adopter program and the product team just made an early alfa of the service available for that program and I have been giving it a spin. The post Create a Build vNext build definition appeared first on
href="http://nakedalm.com">naked ALM - Experts in ALM, TFS & lean-agile with Scrum....(Read whole news on source site)

Visual Studio Toolbox: Designing iOS apps inside Visual Studio with Xamarin

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This is the second of another four part series on building cross platform apps using Xamarin and C#. In this episode I am joined by James Montemagno, a developer evangelist at Xamarin. James shows us the new Xamarin Designer for iOS that is integrated directly into Visual Studio to design iOS applications. You don't need to use XCode to build the UI. You can stay in Visual Studio! We take a look at several features of the designer including auto-layout, constraints, and even custom controls. Resources: Try Xamarin today: www.xamarin.com Follow James on Twitter and his
href="http://www.motzcod.es/">personal blog Xamarin developer documentation and blog Parts one, twothree and four of James' debut Xamarin series
...(Read whole news on source site)

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