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How I Use Azure IaaS for Lab VMs

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Originally posted on: http://geekswithblogs.net/bjackett/archive/2014/08/27/how-i-use-azure-iaas-for-lab-vms.aspx   Many years ago I posted How I Blog walking through my blogging process.  Over the past few months many of my coworkers and customers have been talking or asking about how to use Azure IaaS for dev / test environments (especially for SharePoint).  In this post I’ll walk through the configurations I use, tools that have helped me, and other tips. Note: This is not meant to be a post on best practices for rolling out your Azure IaaS infrastructure to support SharePoint.  This is just my current setup as an reference example
for others to learn from.  For some best practices please read Wictor Wilen’s post on Microsoft Azure IAAS and SharePoint 2013 tips and tricks and listen to the Microsoft Cloud Show podcast interview  Episode 040 - Talking to Wictor Wilen about Hosting SharePoint VMs in IaaS he participated in.   Background    For over 6 months now I have been running my primary set of lab VMs in Azure Infrastructure as a Service...(Read whole news on source site)

To take thy code personally - Yes or No? That is the question...

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One area of conversation that tends to come about in software engineering is the degree to which one takes their code personally. Litmus test: that shiny gem you wrote was code reviewed and recommendations are made to make some changes. Do you:
turn red, tell the reviewer how idiotic they are, storm away, and start looking secretly for a new job?listen to what the other party has to say and make sense of it as a learning experience?
Now this is only one of many examples of taking code 'personally,' and realistically is a
bit of an extreme in option 'a.' This behavior though takes shape and evolves in different ways, but I believe if this is an attribute you posses it's one to shake and shed fast for the betterment of your career,

I have for years stated it wasn't the physical lines of code I laid down, but the byproduct of what I learned that is the real personal reward. I've written apps over the years that for one reason or another didn't make it to prod or where short lived. However the experienced gained from what I did was what kept...(Read whole news on source site)

La Communauté .NET Montréal fait peau neuve!

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Les habitués de la Communauté .NET Montréal auront déjà noté le changement de branding pour la rentrée:Nouveau nom:La Communauté .NET Montréal devient MS DEV MTL.
Nouveau logo:Il est à noter que le nouveau logo à été choisi par processus de votes auprès de nos membres (et j’adore le résultat!).Nouvelle url (mais site identique sur meetup):www.msdevmtl.com

Pour un petit historique et une explication détaillée, voir le billet de Guy Barrette:
http://blog.guybarrette.com/post/2014/07/21/Du-changement-a-la-Communaute-NET-Montreal.aspx
QnA:Suite à certaines remarques ou interrogations reçues, veuillez noter ceci:Est-ce que le groupe est remplacé par un autre ?
Non. Ceci n’est qu’un changement de nom et logo.

Est-ce que la formule
change ?
Non. Nous ferons toujours plusieurs meetings de 2h par mois majoritairement le lundi soir.
Est-ce que le groupe s’est joint à un autre ?
Non.
Fait peut-être moins connu: La communauté est en fait un groupe “parapluie” qui englobe plusieurs sous-groupes (.NET/ASP.NET/Apps, Azure, ALM, Architecture, SQL) comme cela est le cas depuis quelques années. Ces sous-groupes évoluent tout comme les technologies, d’ou la naissance du groupe Azure et la disparition de ALT.NET récemment, mais toujours avec des intérêts reliés à Microsoft.
Y aura t’il un changement de focus technologique ?
Pas vraiment. Comme l’explique Guy dans son billet, tout n’est plus uniquement...(Read whole news on source site)

Solomon, the architect

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Two junior developers who started working for the company at the same time, had been quite competitive with each other from the get-go. They had once been assigned to the same team, but because of the constant bickering, which had put a serious amount of stress on the team, one of them was pulled off the project and reassigned.

A good year later, just the two of them were assigned to a new smallish, but interesting in-house project. When management assigned them to the same project again, they had just been shuffling resources around, and had no
idea of the history these two had. An architect was also assigned to the project, but this was not more than a formality. As soon as the enterprise architecture diagram was updated and the paper work was out of the way, he would do an official hand over, but he would only occasionally check in on the project from then on.

The Friday morning after the hand over, the architect was making small talk with one of the project managers in the coffee corner. His agenda for the day was almost empty - exactly how he liked it on...(Read whole news on source site)

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